Wang To Pitch In Extended Spring Training

Looking to get Chien-Ming Wang some work in a game-type setting, the Yankees will have him throw an extended spring training game on Thursday. From Kat O’Brien:

Wang, who will remain on the Yankees active roster, is scheduled to throw 100 pitches in front of Yankees Tampa-based officials Mark Newman and Nardi Contreras.

This way, Joe Girardi explained, Wang can attempt to figure out what’s wrong pitching in game conditions as opposed to more bullpen sessions. Part of the problem has been that Wang has looked good in the bullpen between starts and before games, but has struggled in games.

“We think he needs to pitch,” Girardi said.

The Yankees next need a starter other than the four currently in the rotation next Tuesday against Detroit. Hopefully Wang gets his head screwed back on by then, and he can retake his rightful place in what looks to be a great rotation. If not, expect to see Phil Hughes, Ian Kennedy, or Alfredo Aceves get a shot.… Click here to read the rest

Nady Does Not Require Surgery

WFAN is reporting that Xavier Nady will not require surgery on his injured right elbow. He will do rehab to nurse a strained ligament back to health, with the time frame still unclear. He will not miss the remainder of the season.

Update: Jon Heyman is reporting

that the rehab is likely to take “a period of weeks.” The fact that the discussion is not in terms of months seems like a good sign.

In an entirely unrelated note that I would like to mention here for no particular purpose, Ken Rosenthal checks in on Jim Edmonds:

Free agent Jim Edmonds, mindful of injuries to outfielders such as Vladimir Guerrero, Xavier Nady and Jose Guillen, has increased the intensity of his workouts, according to his agent, Paul Cohen. While Edmonds believes he can be ready in 2 1/2-3 weeks, executives are reluctant to wait even that long to fill more pressing needs.

Hmm, a power lefty bat in Yankee Stadium who can play all three outfield positions and will only cost money?… Click here to read the rest

The Ticket Price Problem

Jaon at IIATMS runs through the factors that contributed to the premium tickets to games at the new Yankees Stadium going unsold:

The economy tanked
Personal wealth linked to the capital markets tanked
Jobs disappeared
Government bailout of Wall Street behemoths
Many, many Wall Street financial institutions merged/disappeared
Many “feeder” industries reliant on Wall Street (like the lawyers) to pay their hourly rates suffered
Tactical error: The Yanks failed to realize that there were thresholds that firms could spend entertaining clients and the tickets (and dinner and car services) would put the firms over the threshold, making the expense non-reimbursable.
A few weeks back, we went to a friends’ house for an afternoon. While watching the Masters with my friend (a Wall Streeter), we were discussing this and he made an interesting point. He said to me: “Jason, even if I had those great seats that cost $2500 a ticket, I can’t take a client there. It’s not worth the risk.” I asked him about what risk he was talking about and his answer surprised me as I hadn’t thought of that: “If someone recognizes me sitting behind the dugout and it comes out that I used my Firm’s resources for those seats, and we’ve taken TARP money from the government, I don’t want that sort of publicity or getting calls from The Post.” He’s not a famous guy at all, but there’s a fear that someone might see him and he’ll get “outted” for using Firm money to attend a game.

Click here to read the rest

The embarrassment of the rich

But the point today is how patently absurd the Yanks decision to price tickets as if they were scalpers during the playoffs. They clearly saw gap between face prices and scalper prices and said “that’s our money“. So they devised a strategy that pegged the potential buying audience (ultra-rich and corporations) with their ability to pay scalper prices. Then the world changed, plus they made at least one tactical error:

  1. The economy tanked
  2. Personal wealth linked to the capital markets tanked
  3. Jobs disappeared
  4. Government bailout of Wall Street behemoths
  5. Many, many Wall Street financial institutions merged/disappeared
  6. Many “feeder” industries reliant on Wall Street (like the lawyers) to pay their hourly rates suffered
  7. Tactical error: The Yanks failed to realize that there were thresholds that firms could spend entertaining clients and the tickets (and dinner and car services) would put the firms over the threshold, making the expense non-reimbursable.

A few weeks back, we went to a friends’ house for an afternoon.… Click here to read the rest

Minor Notes: Brackman Strong

Andrew Brackman Goes 6, No Walks

Following two starts where he was effective, but not dominant, Brackman finally breezed through a lineup last night. He struck out 8 and walked none in 6 innings, allowing 2 earned runs. Brackman has a long way to go, but a few more starts like this could push him to Tampa fairly quickly. He’s throwing at his old velocity, and inducing plenty of ground outs, so really control is all that is left for him to accomplish. Brackman has managed to get fairly deep into each game he has played, even though I’d guess that he is on a strict pitch count, and may have stayed in for the 7th inning had rain not interuppted his start.

David Adams Starts Strong

2nd baseman David Adams is the forgotten 3rd round pick from the 2008 draft. After losing Cole and Biddle to college, Adams and Jeremy Bleich have to carry the draft class’s torch. To understand Adams, some history may be required.… Click here to read the rest