Ghosts of left fielders past

Merry Christmas, Yankee fans. All I wanted for Christmas this year was a deep playoff run, and I got it in spades! Next year? A repeat would be nice. The team that is currently scheduled to take the field in April projects to do very well. With any luck, Brian Cashman will either sign or trade for a real left fieder. Larry openly covets Matt Holliday. You know what, now that we’ve added a real 4th starter I do too. Let’s go for the kill, and secure another trip through the Canyon of Heroes in the process. But, at a Continue reading Ghosts of left fielders past

Bizarre Moves from Seasons Past: The non-signing of Vladimir Guerrero

Welcome to the latest installment of Yankeeist’s “Bizarre Moves from Seasons Past” series. We previously covered the trading of Mike Lowell, the non-signing of David Ortiz and the non-signing of Andy Pettitte after the 2003 season. Following the Yankees’ World Series loss to the Marlins in 2003, every Yankee fan immediately turned their attention to free agency, armed with the knowledge that one of the most exciting and dangerous hitters in the game, Vladimir Guerrero, was hitting the market. Guerrero, who, up until that point had played his entire career in the barren baseball wasteland of Montreal, was fresh off Continue reading Bizarre Moves from Seasons Past: The non-signing of Vladimir Guerrero

Gaudin As 5th Starter? Ridiculous.

From Ken Rosenthal: A rival executive says that neither Phil Hughes nor Joba Chamberlain should be in the Yankees’ rotation next season. Instead, the exec suggests that the Yankees keep both youngsters in their bullpen and make Chad Gaudin their fifth starter. Not a crazy thought. But if the Yankees enact such a plan, they are far more likely to use Alfredo Aceves as their fifth starter, according to a source with knowledge of the team’s thinking. The Yankees mostly have used Aceves as a reliever, but he was a starter in Mexico and at Class AA and AAA — Continue reading Gaudin As 5th Starter? Ridiculous.

Commish For A Day II: #6

Since we’re into the slow news days leading up to the end of the year, I’ll start running a few more of the “Commish For A Day” suggestions that I have received. If you’d like to submit your ideas, please email me This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it but make sure they are ready for posting (ie: they read reasonably well, contain the links you used to support your case, etc., as I’m not making any edits). Remember, I might not agree with every submission, but they are good for discussion.

The sixth “Commish For A Day” submission is from

Other “CFAD” submissions

  1. Commish For A Day II: #1 Expand Playoff Teams
  2. Commish For A Day II: #2 Roster Expansion
  3. Commish For A Day II: #3 Expand the DH to the NL
  4. Commish For A Day II: #4 Umpire Statistics
  5. Commish For A Day II: #5 Salary Cap & Floor

Continue reading Commish For A Day II: #6

Commish For A Day II: #5 Salary Cap & Floor

Since we’re into the slow news days leading up to the end of the year, I’ll start running a few more of the “Commish For A Day” suggestions that I have received. If you’d like to submit your ideas, please email me This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it but make sure they are ready for posting (ie: they read reasonably well, contain the links you used to support your case, etc., as I’m not making any edits). Remember, I might not agree with every submission, but they are good for discussion.

The fifth “Commish For A Day” submission is from Avenger-in-Chief of Avenging Jack Murphy:

As commissioner for a day and fan of a small market team in the San Diego Padres there is little doubt which issue I would address first: competitive balance restored through the installation of a Salary cap and floor. It is clear to all but a few that the luxury tax does little to deter those with means and even worse it fails to require the small markets to reinvest the distributed monies back into the on field product.

I know, I know. I’m horribly un-American and as far as you know the illegitimate ancestor of Karl Marx. How dare I suggest that the worker have a ceiling on what his labor can earn or that all franchises retain some level of economic equality despite not pulling their own financial weight. I know it sounds like socialism and probably more like downright blasphemy in Yankee Country but before we go mud slinging let’s examine a few things first.

As commissioner I would seek to copy business models that are successful in my field and there’s no better professional sports league to copy than the NFL. The NFL has a salary cap (roughly $128 million) and a floor (87.6% of the cap) right now but more importantly it has this unique quality: the belief by its fans that the team that they support has a chance to compete year in and year out*.

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Continue reading Commish For A Day II: #5 Salary Cap & Floor

Commish For A Day II: #4 Umpire Statistics

Since we’re into the slow news days leading up to the end of the year, I’ll start running a few more of the “Commish For A Day” suggestions that I have received. If you’d like to submit your ideas, please email me This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it but make sure they are ready for posting (ie: they read reasonably well, contain the links you used to support your case, etc., as I’m not making any edits). Remember, I might not agree with every submission, but they are good for discussion.

The fourth “Commish For A Day” submission is from Thomas J.:

First let me say I like instant replay for boundary calls. With the new stadiums getting more complex, I think it is very difficult to see the outfield wall at many ballparks and umpires cannot always tell from that far away what the correct call is. There are not many disputed boundary calls during the season and usually one quick instant replay will show the correct call. I believe it is worthwhile to take a couple minutes occasionally to get these calls correct but full instant replay would be way too time consuming. I really like the human error in baseball too and would hate to see strike zones and base calls become computerized. I think half the fun in baseball is arguing whether that pitch was a ball or strike.

Now onto Umpire Statistics, I think umpires should be held accountable for their calls and statistics should be kept so the public and MLB know who the best and worst umpires are. There are now statistics for everything that happens on the field but I never see umpire statistics and the amount of blown calls they have. I would like to see percentages for correctly called strikes and balls, fair/foul calls, and safe and out calls at bases. Those are the three main categories I can think of; calls like check swings are difficult since there is not an absolute definition for what a check swing is.

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Continue reading Commish For A Day II: #4 Umpire Statistics

Commish For A Day II: #3 Expand the DH to the NL

Since we’re into the slow news days leading up to the end of the year, I’ll start running a few more of the “Commish For A Day” suggestions that I have received. If you’d like to submit your ideas, please email me This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it but make sure they are ready for posting (ie: they read reasonably well, contain the links you used to support your case, etc., as I’m not making any edits).

The third “Commish For A Day” submission is from Mike Silva of NYBD, reprinted with his permission. Remember, I might not agree with every submission, but they are good for discussion.

There is talk that Bud Selig’s newly minted advisory committee will actually tackle issues in baseball and push for change in various areas. One of the topics is the future of the designated hitter. Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune believes the DH might be facing its greatest threat since it was permanently adopted by the American League in 1976. If I had the choice not only would I keep the position, but expand it to the National League.

In an age where .500 pitchers are making $10 million dollars there is no need for them to swing a bat or run the bases. Pitching is hard enough and I am tired of watching 99% of pitchers swing like they are swatting flies. I think some of the members of the NYBD softball team stand a better chance in the batter’s box than these guys. Let them concentrate on what they are paid to do pitch.

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Continue reading Commish For A Day II: #3 Expand the DH to the NL