Wilpon’s insistence on selling only a non-controlling interest is going to be tested

I’ll turn back to the Chass article which also gets at the kernel of why control is required, or at least attainable:

Why would anyone buy, at a high price, a minority interest and be partners with Fred and his son?” asked a lawyer who has been involved in baseball. […]

Jeff Wilpon, the Mets’ chief operating officer, would be the first member of the family to run the Mets after Fred is no longer active. But Jeff is also a potential problem for the family. “Most buyers won’t want anything to do with Jeff Wilpon,” the lawyer said. “He’s a light weight and has a bad reputation. I can’t imagine a buyer not wanting an option to buy him out when Fred dies.”

Jeff Wilpon is typical of many sons of wealthy owners. They are in their positions only because their fathers own the teams, having done nothing to earn their jobs and exhibiting a lack of baseball knowledge.Click here to read the rest

Wilpons’ integrity in question?

Chass continues:

It’s the possibility that Wilpon knew or should have known that Madoff was running a Ponzi scheme that has prompted the trustee to seek more money from the Wilpon entities than they gained from their investments.

If Wilpon knew something wasn’t right about the Madoff operation and failed to alert authorities, he could be held liable for losses suffered by other investors Madoff swindled.

“That’s a devastating allegation,” the lawyer said. Noting that the trustee’s lawsuit was filed under seal at the request of Wilpon’s lawyers, he added, “The seal is another reason why Wilpon has to settle. The reason we want to see what is sealed is the same reason Wilpon wanted it sealed. There must be serious allegations that Wilpon did some bad things.”

The most creative aspect of Chass’ piece is the solution he proposes (not that I think it’s possible or even likely):

There are plenty of wealthy people, in New York alone and especially Mets fans, who could make that kind of investment, but [Irving] Picard [the trustee for the victims of Madoff’s massive Ponzi scheme] is closest to the situation and should get the first shot at becoming Wilpon’s partner, particularly because part of the money he would be investing would be coming from Wilpon himself.Click here to read the rest

Yu Darvish: The next great Yankee righthander?

Nippon Professional Baseball superstar Yu Darvish, a 24-year-old righthander who, by many accounts, is not only the best pitcher in Japan but may have the potential to become one of the best starting pitchers in Major League Baseball, recently took over the comment thread of our post looking at next offseason, as it’s expected the Yankees will be all over him when the Nippon Ham Fighters post him next winter.

And if the Yankees really do want him, I wouldn’t be surprised if they did whatever it takes next winter. Between a rather uninspiring crop of free agent starters, as well as the fact that they can reallocate the $160 million they were willing to spend on Cliff Lee and put it toward what could be a Daisuke Matsuzaka-esque $50 million posting fee, along with what RAB’s Mike Axisa expects to be a Felix Hernandez-type contract, for a total cost of around $130 million, the Yankees seem poised to be able to make a big splash with Darvish.… Click here to read the rest

J-Dusch joins the AL East … with the O’s

I’m slightly disappointed to announce that another potential rotation solution (not named Sergio Mitre) has been taken off the table. ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reported last night that Justin Duchscherer has reached an agreement with the Orioles. The one year pact is worth as much as $4.5M in salary and incentives; however, only $700k is guaranteed. Apparently, the two finalists in the Duchscherer sweepstakes were the O’s and Nationals despite a plethora of teams showing interest early on. The general consensus among us here at Yankeeist was that he’d be a worthwhile investment so long as the price was cheap.

Over the course of his career, he’s pitched to a 3.13 ERA, 3.86 FIP, and a 4.01 xFIP (9 K/9, 2.4 BB/9, 0.93 HR/9, .265 BABIP). With that being said, he’s only managed twenty or more starts once in his career (2008), and managed to pitch only 28 innings in 2010. During that time he pitched to a 2.89 ERA (although his 4.58 FIP and 4.65 xFIP certainly left something to be desired).… Click here to read the rest

Assessing Brian Cashman’s reign-Part 1 of 5

Brian Cashman has become something of a lightning rod this off season, drawing criticism from fans and media types for both his lack of activity and distancing himself from the Soriano deal. But he also has his defenders, and while appearing on Mike Silva’s radio show last night Mike cited a poll he ran where the voting came in 2/3 positive on Cashman. We all know GMs will have their share of good and bad moves, but who’s more right here? On balance, is he a good or bad GM?

I wanted to take a look at what his track record has been since taking over full control of Baseball Ops in 2005. That’s an important milestone for Brian, taking full control (and responsibility) for baseball decisions. In the previous period, some moves were made by George, others by ‘The Crack Committee’ so the waters are too muddied to know whether or not Brian was 100% behind those moves. I’m going to look at each year the way BR does it, beginning in November (when the off season begins) and ending in October of the following year.… Click here to read the rest

Assessing Brian Cashman's reign-Part 1 of 5

Brian Cashman has become something of a lightning rod this off season, drawing criticism from fans and media types for both his lack of activity and distancing himself from the Soriano deal. But he also has his defenders, and while appearing on Mike Silva’s radio show last night Mike cited a poll he ran where the voting came in 2/3 positive on Cashman. We all know GMs will have their share of good and bad moves, but who’s more right here? On balance, is he a good or bad GM?

I wanted to take a look at what his track record has been since taking over full control of Baseball Ops in 2005. That’s an important milestone for Brian, taking full control (and responsibility) for baseball decisions. In the previous period, some moves were made by George, others by ‘The Crack Committee’ so the waters are too muddied to know whether or not Brian was 100% behind those moves. I’m going to look at each year the way BR does it, beginning in November (when the off season begins) and ending in October of the following year.… Click here to read the rest

TYU on NYBD

I’ll be appearing on Mike Silva’s New York Baseball Digest show tonight @ 8:30 PM. Topics will include Brian Cashman, and some of the recent goings on here at TYU. There may also be a conference call between me and Frank Russo, and while we’re both die-hard Yankee fans he comes at it from a very different perspective than I do, which could get ugly interesting. Give it a listen, Mike does a fun show really knows his NY Baseball. Click Here to listen live.… Click here to read the rest

More mainstream love for the Yankee farm system

The New York Post’s Kevin Kernan is arguably one of the worst mainstream writers covering the Yankees today — and that’s saying a lot, considering the sheer volume of people competing for that particular honor — but he’s got a great piece up today about Dellin Betances, and it also features brief looks at some of the other promising names we’ve heard so much about this winter, including Manny Banuelos and Andrew Brackman (of course), as well as D.J. Mitchell, Hector Noesi, Ivan Nova, David Phelps and Adam Warren.… Click here to read the rest