Why I believe Andy Pettitte is coming back

I haven’t chimed in all that much on the Andy Pettitte saga, as there’s only so much speculating one can do about a man’s decision to continue to play baseball or stay home with his family, but the story in today’s Daily News compelled me to comment. I’m not a father yet, and so I can’t relate to what Andy is going through at this moment in time. However, while he may have missed out on some cherished family time during his 16-year baseball career, on the flip side he has made more money than the Pettittes ever could have Continue reading Why I believe Andy Pettitte is coming back

Pettitte unlikely to start season with Yanks

Brian Cashman added a bit of clarity to the seemingly never ending drama regarding Andy Pettitte’s return to pinstripes. Reporters caught up with him at the owner’s meetings yesterday, and the NY Daily News has the report: “I don’t think he’s determined if he’s officially finished or not, but he’s chosen at this stage at least not to start in 2011,” Cashman said. “If that ever changes he’ll call us. We’re not going to hound him or bother him.” Cashman then clarified his comments to say that nothing had changed in the situation, and that the Yankees were still waiting Continue reading Pettitte unlikely to start season with Yanks

Pettitte won’t begin season with Yanks *UPDATED*

Reading this begs one natural question.  First the set-up:

Andy Pettitte won’t be playing baseball at the start of the 2011 season, according to Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who says the left-handed veteran told him “don’t count on me.”

I don’t think he’s determined if he’s officially finished or not, but he’s chosen at this stage at least not to start in 2011,” Cashman said Wednesday at the baseball owners’ quarterly meetings in Arizona. “If that ever changes he’ll call us. We’re not going to hound him or bother him.”

And the natural question: Is Pettitte setting himself up for the “Roger Clemens Plan”?  Not that plan, but the one where he comes in on the white horse and pitches the second half of the season.

Out of the question? A good idea?

UPDATE #1: As soon as I clicked “publish”, I saw this and it makes the above just fodder for chatter (emphasis mine):

Cashman said you could basically substitute the word “pitch” for the word “start.” What Cashman meant was, at this stage, Pettitte is choosing not to pitch in 2011, but the Yankees are — as they’ve been all winter — waiting for Pettitte to let them know something official. He’s leaning toward retirement, and he’ll let them know if that situation changes.

Nothing new or different,” Cashman said. “Exactly what I’ve been saying for the past month or two months.”

Bah.

UPDATE #2: The fantastic Tyler Kepner adds a bit more besides what was mentioned in Update #1:

Asked if the Yankees had spoken to Pettitte about the possibility of pitching a partial season, as Roger Clemens and Pedro Martinez have done in recent years, Cashman said, “We have not talked to him about anything like that, no.

Ask me and I’ll still say the door is wide open. Unless the conspiracy theorists are right or until I see Pettitte announcing his retirement on TV… Continue reading Pettitte won’t begin season with Yanks *UPDATED*

Join me as we hang with Donnie Baseball

I was lucky enough to get invited to attend this private party at the Gotham Comedy Club on 1/26/11:

Question & Answer session with Don Mattingly and Brian Leetch hosted by Matt Yallof and Russ Salzberg.  This party includes hearty hors d’oeuvres and an open bar though cocktail service as well as free photos and video of every customer with Don & Brian. The party is hosted by the Award Winning Gotham Comedy Club in NYC. Every customer receives an authentic autographed Mattingly wood bat and Leetch commemorative book.

There are a select number of discounted tickets still available.  If you are interested, please contact Ken here and be sure to use my name. Here’s the official registration form but remember, you can get an additional 25% off the pricing. Continue reading Join me as we hang with Donnie Baseball

Discussion: Most Underrated Yankee By Yankees Fans

I suggested on Twitter that Jorge Posada is the most underrated Yankee by Yankees fans of all-time, and received a multitude of responses on the subject. Posada is one of the 3 best catchers of the last 15 years and is a legitimate Hall of Fame candidate, but I find that many Yankees fans just see him as a solid player who was fortunate enough to play on good teams. Here are some other nominations for the most underrated Yankee: @Cephster: Jimmy Key you almost never hear about him @rstowe75: Bernie Williams @eddieperez23: I’d say ARod. @AndrewLeighNYC: it goes back Continue reading Discussion: Most Underrated Yankee By Yankees Fans

The worst players in baseball

[Editor’s note: This post has been moved back up to the top in case people missed it this morning.] Matt recently ran a post analyzing two bad pitchers, Sergio Mitre and Tim Wakefield. This was a novel concept. Normally here at Yankeeist we spend our time analyzing good baseball players (Editor’s Note: This isn’t entirely accurate, but I’ll let it slide). However, we can just as easily analyze the bad ones. So, this post is dedicated to the worst players in terms of fWAR in all of baseball, in each of the past five seasons. 2006 Ronny Cedeno, SS Chicago Continue reading The worst players in baseball

Is Trevor Hoffman a Lock for the Hall of Fame (or Even a Worthy Candidate)?

(The following is being syndicated from The Captain’s Blog) When Trevor Hoffman recorded his 600th save back in September, I kind of paid him a backhanded complement by unfavorably comparing him to Mariano Rivera. The intention wasn’t to denigrate Hoffman, who has had a wonderful career, but rebut the notion that put both relievers in the same class. In any event, Hoffman has now officially retired with 601 saves, leaving him just 42 ahead of Rivera, so, when all is said and done, he may eventually find himself looking up at the great Yankees closer in even that regard. For a fitting tribute Continue reading Is Trevor Hoffman a Lock for the Hall of Fame (or Even a Worthy Candidate)?

Hughes, Nova make Verducci’s annual YAE list

Yankees Phil Hughes and Ivan Nova have made Tom Verducci’s annual Year After Effect list (emphasis mine):

Now it’s time to identify the red-flagged pitchers of 2011 — the 25-and-younger pitchers whose workload last year jumped by more than 30 innings. (All innings are considered: minors, Arizona Fall League, majors and postseason…)

Remember, this is a rule of thumb meant simply to identify pitchers who pushed the envelope to put them more at risk than others. And keep in mind that as Hernandez, Johnson and Scherzer proved last year, the risk is much lower for bigger-bodied pitchers who are at the older end of the age spectrum.

As happened last year, some pitchers pose much less of a risk of regression. Price, for instance, who turns 26 this season, and Hughes, who turns 25, fit the lower-risk profile: big bodies on the older side of the spectrum

This list is nothing but one man’s attempt to call out the “young and abused”. It is, by no means, a hard and fast rule and Verducci himself is the first to admit it. But, it bears watching.

For prior YAE stuff, click here. Continue reading Hughes, Nova make Verducci’s annual YAE list

2011 Breakout Candidates

[image title=”slade-heathcott1″ size=”full” id=”24263″ align=”center” linkto=”full” ]The story of 2010 in the Yankee farm system was no doubt, “The Killer B’s all break out.” It provided a huge dose of excitement for us Yankee fans that had been missing (besides Jesus Montero talk) since Phil Hughes, Joba Chamberlain, and Ian Kennedy were coming up. We probably shouldn’t expect 2011 to go as well as 2010 did, but who will be the Killer Bs of 2011? After the them and Jesus Montero exit the farm system, who will  provide the excitement? Here are my three candidates. The Favorite: Gary Sanchez – Continue reading 2011 Breakout Candidates