Girardi needs to trust his starters.

If you follow a lot of the same people I follow on Twitter, you’ve probably noticed a pretty consistent in-game criticism of Joe Girardi developing this season; he’s going to his bullpen too early. In addition to yesterday’s game with the Orioles, there have been two other stand-out examples; Freddy Garcia‘s first start of the season, and C.C. Sabathia‘s 7 shutout innings effort against the Twins (otherwise known as the game that shall not be spoken of). There have been a handful of others it’s been debated in, but those were much more marginal examples that probably aren’t worth including.

Up until now, I haven’t really jumped into this with both feet because I’ve been able to see some rational arguments for both sides. While I think Sabathia and Garcia both could have pitched a little longer, but there were also reasonable arguments for not pushing them. Considering how early in the season it was, I just wasn’t going to get worked up over.

Well I’m getting off of that bus for the moment, because there was absolutely no reason for taking Freddy Garcia out of yesterday’s game. Through 6 innings Garcia had allowed zero runs, two hits, walked two batter, and struck out seven while throwing just 90 pitches. He was having no problems with the Orioles’ lineup, and his stuff looked great. Unless Garcia told Girardi he wasn’t feeling up to another inning or something, there’s absolutely no reason not to send him out to at least attempt to get another inning, or more, out of him. This was an example of Girardi being far too eager to go to his bullpen.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying this directly allowed the Orioles to come back, or that the bullpen shouldn’t have been able to close the game out in regulation. But over the long term, the bullpen is going to have to put in a lot of unnecessary work if Girardi doesn’t trust guys like Garcia to pitch into the 7th even when they’ve got their best stuff, and as I said the other day; making too many pitching changes is like taking too many turns at Russian roulette. Continue reading Girardi needs to trust his starters.

Better Prince Fielder Than Prince Albert. Seriously.

PrinceQuake


There’s a great bar called the Mucky Duck in San Francisco where fans gather to watch the Giants.  These are fans who, by virtue of prolonged dedication to their team, have more than a cursory knowledge of National League baseball.  During a game earlier this month, while a frustrating Giants lineup was getting torched by Clayton Kershaw, my friend commented that Prince Fielder would look really good in orange and cream.  There was unanimous scoffing and even a little unpleasant name-calling from the surrounding patrons.  They didn’t want to hear it.

This reaction surprised me.  But maybe it shouldn’t have.  Most discussions of the fabled 2012 class of free agents have focused on Albert Pujols and, until recently, Adrian Gonzalez.  Fielder, for some reason, is treated as an afterthought, a consolation prize.  From what I can tell, the rationale for dismissing him goes like this: He’s really big.  Big players don’t age well.  He can’t play defense.  He’s going to have to move to DH.  He’s surly.  He’s inconsistent.  He hasn’t fulfilled the promise of his 50 HR season at age 23.  The problem with this account is that where it isn’t patently false, it is at least hyperbolic.

(click “view full post” to read more) Continue reading Better Prince Fielder Than Prince Albert. Seriously.

Game 18: Yankees 6, Orioles 3

Playing yet another rain-shortened series, the Yankees looked for the two-game sweep of the Baltimore Orioles on Sunday.  After the slugfest that was Saturday evening’s game, the Yankees held a quick, but small lead through most of the afternoon on Sunday.  The second blown save in as many attempts by Mariano Rivera, however, sent the game into extra innings, where the Bombers were able to pull away in the eleventh inning for the 6-3 victory.

The Pinstripes got things started quickly, as Derek Jeter lead off with a single to center. Curtis Granderson followed with a two-run homer, and the Yankees took an early lead. Mark Teixeira and Alex Rodriguez both worked walks, but Robinson Cano, Nick Swisher and Jorge Posada were unable to capitalize, as they went down in order to end the threat.

Veteran hurler, Freddy Garcia, was on the mound for New York, and he looked sharp early, pitching a 1-2-3 first inning.  In the bottom of the second, he gave up a single to Luke Scott and walked Adam Jones and Matt Wieters before striking out Cesar Izturis to escape the inning with the Bombers’ 2-0 lead intact.

(click “view full post” to read more) Continue reading Game 18: Yankees 6, Orioles 3

Yankees pick up extra-innings victory, despite Rivera blown save

Mariano Rivera blew consecutive saves for the first time since 2007 after he failed to convert a four out save. Despite the set back, and a 40 minute rain delay in the top of the 11th, the Yankees hung on to pick up a 6-3 win in Baltimore, and improve the team’s record to 12-6. Freddy Garcia gave the Yankees his second strong start of the season. Garcia allowed only two hits and two walks over the first six innings of the game. The Yankees were leading 3-0 when he left. Joba Chamberlain came on to pitch the seventh and Continue reading Yankees pick up extra-innings victory, despite Rivera blown save

The week that was at IIATMS, 4/24/11

A very eventful week here at IIATMS with lots of tasty morsels still to be sampled.

That’s the week in review. Feel free to ignore Mariano Rivera‘s two blown saves this week. Unless you’re a panic-monger and want to predict the end of the world while you’re at it. Continue reading The week that was at IIATMS, 4/24/11

Open Thread-Montero sings soprano

Uber-prospect Jesus Montero had a rather unfortunate incident this afternoon. I’ll let Donnie Collins of the Scranton Wilkes-Barres Times fill you in on the details: UPDATE, 3:50: Montero just took a foul ball off the cup. That is just an awful, awful feeling (take it from someone who caught growing up). People think the cup protects that area, but if you get hit there, forget it. There’s still a lot of pain. Montero is on his back now. Looks like he got shot. UPDATE, 3:53: That’s a scary scene involving Montero. He was helped to his feet, and his knees Continue reading Open Thread-Montero sings soprano

New Book Highlights Jeter – Rodriguez Rift

The Post has some excerpts from the new Ian O’Connor book on Derek Jeter: Jeter, who prized poise and selflessness, dismissed A-Rod and his diva-like behavior. And when fans and rival players criticized A-Rod, Jeter deferred instead of defending his teammate. General Manager Brian Cashman noticed this and asked Jeter to “fake it” with A-Rod. “You’ve got to lead them all, the ones you like and the ones you don’t,” he told him. He asked him to appeal to Yankee fans on A-Rod’s behalf. “I can’t tell the fans what to do,” Jeter countered. A-Rod’s obsession with Jeter continued, the Continue reading New Book Highlights Jeter – Rodriguez Rift

Game 18-“It was beautiful”

That’s what Yankee manager Joe Girardi said last night about Brett Gardner’s HR after Russell Martin was hit by a Josh Rupe pitch. When you start giving up HRs to the Brett Gardner’s of the world, you might want to call your uncle with the plumbing business and tell him to leave a job open for you. There’s a good chance you’ll need it. Here’s what O’s manager Buck Showalter had to say about the incident from last night: Buck Showalter: “We asked (Rupe) after the game. He said, ‘I know what it looked like. I was trying to go Continue reading Game 18-“It was beautiful”

Game 18-"It was beautiful"

That’s what Yankee manager Joe Girardi said last night about Brett Gardner’s HR after Russell Martin was hit by a Josh Rupe pitch. When you start giving up HRs to the Brett Gardner’s of the world, you might want to call your uncle with the plumbing business and tell him to leave a job open for you. There’s a good chance you’ll need it. Here’s what O’s manager Buck Showalter had to say about the incident from last night: Buck Showalter: “We asked (Rupe) after the game. He said, ‘I know what it looked like. I was trying to go Continue reading Game 18-"It was beautiful"