Impatience could determine who wins the ALDS.

On the other side of the coin, I’d like to see Ivan Nova keep the ball off the plate against Delmon Young.  Young swung at the first pitch in 11 of his first 13 plate appearances in the ALDS.  Both of his homers and three of his four hits came off the opening pitch of an at-bat.  In Game 4, A.J. Burnett and Phil Hughes stayed well out of the zone and, though Delmon somewhat surprisingly managed to lay off several pitches, he finished 0-for-3 with a BB.  I expect he’ll be itching to get the bat off his shoulder tonight and Nova needs to let him beat himself.

In all other situations, however, I think Nova should attack Detroit’s hitters.  He had a unusual number of swinging strikes in Game 1, including swinging strikeouts of Miguel Cabrera, Victor Martinez, Austin Jackson, and Ryan Raburn.  Through his first six innings, very few balls were put in play with any authority.  He only got himself into trouble when he gave up free passes, as he did in the 5th and 9th.  Nova needs to make the Tigers prove they can get an extra-base hit off of him before he starts nibbling.

Matt teaches at The University of Alabama. Roll Tide. He specializes in American Literature and Rhetorical Economics. Fate chose for him the peculiar perdition of rooting for the Chicago Cubs and the Los Angeles Clippers.

About Matt Seybold

Matt teaches at The University of Alabama. Roll Tide. He specializes in American Literature and Rhetorical Economics. Fate chose for him the peculiar perdition of rooting for the Chicago Cubs and the Los Angeles Clippers.

8 thoughts on “Impatience could determine who wins the ALDS.

  1. Regarding the splits against Fister, I think you need to compare them to overall splits against all pitchers, if you haven't. Also, one reason hitters may do well on the first pitch is that they swing at good first pitches to hit. If they are less patient, and swing at more first pitches, those good numbers may decline somewhat.