Arizona Fall League: Week 2

I meant to post this yesterday, but I had a surprisingly busy weekend and just now have a chance to sit down and write.  Unfortunately, the Phoenix Desert Dogs have struggled since we last checked in on them.  The team the Yankees prospects are playing for this fall is on an eight-game losing streak, having lost six games this past week.

Daniel Burawa has made two appearances in relief, giving up six runs (only two earned) and seven hits over 2.1 innings.  He took the loss in both games.  Preston Claiborne has also made two appearances, pitching two scoreless innings and giving up just one hit and two walks.  David Phelps made his second start, which went similarly to his first.  He gave up three runs in three innings on four hits, three walks and three strikeouts.  Chase Whitley rounds out the Yankee pitchers for the Desert Dogs.  He also made a pair of relief appearances, pitching a perfect inning the first time with a strikeout.  He gave up a solo homer in his second appearance, giving up just the one run and hit over 1.2 innings.

Corban Joseph went 4-17 in four games this week.  He hit a pair of doubles and worked a couple walks along with a stolen base.  Rob Segedin has been playing well for Phoenix.  He went 9-23 this week with a double, a homer and four RBIs.  Segedin scored two runs and worked a pair of walks.  Ronnier Mustelier left the second game he played in the fourth inning and did not make an appearance this week.  I have yet to see any word on what the reason is behind this, but if I find out I will let you know.
Continue reading Arizona Fall League: Week 2

Story of a Season: Brett Gardner

Other Stories Brett Gardner had an up and down season. He started it off as the Yankees’ leadoff hitter, but lost the job after a tough first month of the year (.286 wOBA/73 wRC+). The next three months were much better, as Gardner produced splits of .337/108; .386/141; and .358/122. He crashed again in August with a .281/68 mark, but ended the year well, hitting .332/104 in September. This isn’t so strange, really. We’ve seen this streakiness from Gardner for the last few years. During the cold streaks, it’s certainly maddening. During the hot streaks, he’s great to watch. He Continue reading Story of a Season: Brett Gardner

Sherman-Long cold winter in the Bronx

Sorry to bum you guys out, but Joel Sherman thinks we should lower our sights as Yankee fans for this off season because he doesn’t think there will be much activity. He spoke to a highly placed Yankee official about their plans for this winter, and came away with the idea that they will bring the 2011 squad back pretty much intact, hoping to retain CC and otherwise doing little besides filling out the bench. He writes: ..I did not sense they had any real affinity for C.J. Wilson, even before his postseason record fell to 1-4 with a 5.40 Continue reading Sherman-Long cold winter in the Bronx

Boston bloodletting may have just begun

Tony Massarotti of the Boston Globe has a piece up where he suggests that changes in Fenway may go far beyond the manager and GM position. He details how little durability and innings they currently have in their starting rotation, how thin the Sox pitching depth is in the upper levels of their farm system, suggesting some big changes may be forthcoming. He writes: What all this means is that the Red Sox need to aggressively explore the trade market for front-line pitching, something that may require them to part with any number of valuable assets depending on the return. Continue reading Boston bloodletting may have just begun

Wait…what?

Bob Raissman apparently just had his turn with the objective pipe, because I don’t know what else could possibly cause someone to write this:

A “minor” heart procedure kept Tim McCarver away from the ALCS microphone for the first two games. Whatever was ailing him hasn’t slowed his mouth down.

Through Games 3, 4, 5, and headed into Game 6 of DetroitTexas Saturday night, McCarver had offered a clinic on first-guessing, one-liners and storytelling. Fox’s team of McCarver and Joe Buck (his voice is back) has again confirmed why it’s baseball’s best.

In all honesty, I kind of warmed up to McCarver this year. I can’t really say why, but he just doesn’t annoy me anymore. Maybe it’s the realization that all national broadcast teams are going to have holes in their knowledge of the teams in the game. Maybe it’s that most of the other color commentators are more annoying than McCarver. Maybe it’s that McCarver did quite a few games with Matt Vasgersian this year in which I found him very much not annoying. I really have no idea why, but McCarver just doesn’t annoy me so much anymore.

(click “view full post” to continue reading) Continue reading Wait…what?

Saturday notes

Hope you’re out enjoying the great weather this weekend (well, I hope the weather’s nice where you are), here’s some baseball related links for your late afternoon.

According to Joel Sherman, Brian Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner will meet to discuss a new contract for the Yankees’ general manager, and a deal should get done without much heavy lifting.

-It sure sounds like C.C. Sabathia has decided that, one way or another, he’ll have a new contract in 2012. (Insider)

Hector Noesi will be starting in Winter ball this year. I’m pretty happy about that decision, as Noesi has been too good in the minor leagues to relegate him to low leverage relief work before giving him a real chance to succeed as a starter. Hopefully this will help get his innings level up to the point he can pitch at least close to a full season in 2012.

This sort of post is going to get really old, really fast, especially once the MSM picks up the theme. Look, this isn’t really that difficult; as they said in the preeminent philosophical work of our time, “it’s not personal, it’s strictly business.” If you only listen to one thing I ever say, make it this; remember your Godfather.

I’m somewhat less opposed to signing Mark Buehrle than I was a couple of weeks ago, but only if there’s no more than one guaranteed year to the contract. The Yankees aren’t so desperate for pitching depth that they need to commit multiple years to an aging groundball pitcher who strikes out fewer than 5 batters per nine innings.

Finally, this is sort of a weird story, as the Yankees have asked their minor league affiliates that share the team’s moniker to find another name. I’m not sure what this means, or if it’s significant in any way, but it’s interesting at the least.



Continue reading Saturday notes

CC’s credibility issue

CC Sabathia is widely expected to exercise his opt-out clause in the coming weeks. In discussing it after the ALDS loss, he said baseball is a business, which is something I think most fans accept. As Joel Sherman noted yesterday, given the lack a true #1 starter on the free agent market this year there will be no shortage of suitors for his services should he hit the open market. The Nats, Tigers, Blue Jays and Red Sox will all have a need and money to spend. Theo may look to make a bold move with the Cubs. The Angels Continue reading CC’s credibility issue

CC's credibility issue

CC Sabathia is widely expected to exercise his opt-out clause in the coming weeks. In discussing it after the ALDS loss, he said baseball is a business, which is something I think most fans accept. As Joel Sherman noted yesterday, given the lack a true #1 starter on the free agent market this year there will be no shortage of suitors for his services should he hit the open market. The Nats, Tigers, Blue Jays and Red Sox will all have a need and money to spend. Theo may look to make a bold move with the Cubs. The Angels Continue reading CC's credibility issue

Draftee ages: continued

In my post yesterday, I described a very interesting study by Rany Jazayerli of Baseball Prospectus, which found that the youngest high school hitters in a draft class were more valuable relative to where they were drafted than the oldest high school hitters in the class.  The implication of these results was that teams don’t seem to adequately take draftee age into account when they are evaluating draft prospects, which made me curious about the Yankees’ evaluation of Cito Culver and Angelo Gumbs, both of whom were drafted at age 17 in 2010. My main criticism of the initial study Continue reading Draftee ages: continued