Hideki Matsui to retire

Hideki Matsui has announced his retirement from Major League Baseball. He will be holding a press conference in New York to make it official.

Matsui, who signed a deal in 2002 to join the Yankees, played in New York for seven seasons, winning one World Series in 2009 and earning the World Series MVP with an 8-13 performance against the Phillies. He hit three home runs and led the Yankees to their first title in nine years.

He batted .282/.360/.462 with 175 homers and 760 RBI in his MLB career.

After leaving New York, Matsui played with the Angels, A’s and he was released by the Rays last season after a disappointing 34 games.

Personally, I always liked Matsui. He was a solid player, his teammates loved him and he provided Yankee fans with a lot of great moments. From the aforementioned World Series MVP to his double in Game Seven of the 2003 ALCS to his grand slam against the Twins in his Yankee Stadium debut, Matsui thrived in the spotlight.

I was at the game on Opening Day in 2003 when he hit that grand slam against the Twins. It was a great introduction into Yankee lore for Matsui and his performance in the 2009 World Series was a nice bookend to close out his career in Pinstripes.

Stacey is co-Editor-in-Chief of It's About The Money and is co-host of the It's About The Yankees, Stupid podcast. When she's not blogging about baseball, she's blogging about the New York Knicks and when she's not doing either of those things, she's tweeting about General Hospital and her cats.

9 thoughts on “Hideki Matsui to retire

  1. Tommy

    I know this expression is overused at times, but he really did play the game the right way. Hustled, came up clutch, was respectful toward other players and the umps, and garnered the adoration of fans. I hope he comes back for Old-Timers' Day.

    • brian

      well put………..

      I'll always wonder how differently the last 10 years would have played out if Matsui came to the Yankees at… say.. 21 instead of 29 and we got all those prime years, dude was a tremendous hitter under pressure… I daresay he could have swung another title our way if he had been younger and more physically able

      Remember, Derek Jeter (the ultimate you-have-to-earn-your-keep person) .. was going out of his way to say how much he admired Matsui even before the 2009 world series, if that doesn't speak to the class, heart, toughness, and integrity that Godzilla brought to the Yankees… I don't know what would

      He was really one of the only Yankees who kind of came in and joined that jeter-rivera-bernie-pettite-posada group by earning their respect

    • ProfRobert

      Agreed. A complete class act. I wish him a long and happy retirement.

  2. Kevin S

    Great Yankee–great hitter, team player, effort, clutch player–Three tremendous years in 03, 04, 05–not quite the same after the injury but hit when it mattered

  3. Wow …Totally agree. Matsui is amazing and will be amazing forever. Thank you very much for your effort and the exchange of experience. I wish you successes.

  4. DJ JD (Jeff)

    I had the pleasure of watching Matsui during his entire career in Japan while he played for the Yomuiri Giants, and was overwhelmed with joy when he signed with the Yankees! I couldn't agree more with Brian with the thought of what it could have been like if the Yankees got him 10 years earlier. I was so angry when the dropped him after his final year considering his entire Yankee career and his WS MVP performance. Of course it is hard to say whether he would have continued to perform as well with the Yankees or performed the same as he did with the other teams, but I would have loved to have kept seeing him play for the Yankees regardless. Much success to you in your future Matsuisan. Domo Arigato Gozaimasu ありがとうございます。

  5. brian

    On RAB our good friend "oldyanksfan" tried to cherry pick stats to show how Swisher was actually, and I quote, a "much better player" than Matsui

    And based off WAR… he's got a point, goes to show how as much as baseball is a game of numbers, winning and losing sometimes transcends that

  6. David

    It says a lot about a player how they come back, especially when signing a) with a traditionally difficult team for the home team and b) after leaving post-championship. And I was at the game where Matsui came back and got his ring — the applause, by players and fans at the stadium, was deafening AND Girardi and Jeter knew and liked Matsui well enough to play a practical joke on him with the ring!

    A reminder from Jason on the day: http://itsaboutthemoney.net/archives/2010/04/14/t

  7. A great player, and a great example that not all True Yankees need to come up through our system.

Comments are closed.