The 2013 Autism Awareness Challenge

Over the years here at IIATMS, I’ve used what little platform I’ve got here to bring awareness to Breast Cancer (my wife works with breast cancer patients daily) as well as Autism (something that afflicts my awesome nephew). April marks the beginning of Autism Awareness Month and one of the best people I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know, at least in a virtual sense, is Maury Brown of The Biz of Baseball. Maury’s son also suffers from Autism and Maury has his kickoff posting here today, and it’s something I request that you go and read.

DONATE TO AUTISM SPEAKS

At the very least, read his posting and get educated. Maybe not for you, but for a loved one. Share this on Facebook and Twitter and any other place you thing others will read. It’s that important.

Thank you,
Jason and the entire IIATMS/TYA team

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From Maury’s posting;

We challenge you to this:

Spread the details below to others. Pass the link via Twitter or Facebook. Encourage someone you know that may think their child could have autism to read. In doing so, you help increase awareness.

The following is from the Autism Society (http://www.autism-society.org)

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Autism is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum disorder” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and funding can help families today.

In March 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued their ADDM autism prevalence report. The report concluded that the prevalence of autism had risen to 1 in every 88 births in the United States and almost 1 in 54 boys.  The spotlight shown on autism as a result of the prevalence increase opens opportunities for the nation to consider how to serve these families facing a lifetime of supports for their children.

Currently, the Autism Society estimates that the lifetime cost of caring for a child with autism ranges from $3.5 million to $5 million, and that the United States is facing almost $90 billion annually in costs for autism (this figure includes research, insurance costs and non-covered expenses, Medicaid waivers for autism, educational spending, housing, transportation, employment, in addition to related therapeutic services and caregiver costs).

Know the Signs: Early Identification Can Change Lives

Autism is treatable. Children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes.

Here are some signs to look for in the children in your life:

  • Lack of or delay in spoken language
  • Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects)
  • Little or no eye contact
  • Lack of interest in peer relationships
  • Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play
  • Persistent fixation on parts of objects
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About @Jason_IIATMS

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