Yankeemetrics: July 3-6 (Twins)

Zelous Wheeler is all smiles after his first career homer. (Photo credit: Jim Mone/AP)

Zelous Wheeler is all smiles after his first career home run. (Photo credit: Jim Mone/AP)



”Wheels up, Zelous!”
The Yankees snapped their season-high five-game losing streak with a win in the series opener at Minnesota, despite a career-worst night from Masahiro Tanaka.

Tanaka allowed a season-high nine hits and four earned runs, snapping his quality start streak at 16 games, which was tied with CC Sabathia (2010) for the longest in Yankees history.

The 16 quality starts in a row had also matched the longest streak to begin an MLB career, set by the Expos’ Steve Rogers in 1973.

He did get his 12th win of the season, becoming the first Yankee rookie to have at least 12 wins prior to the All-Star break. The last rookie on any team to do that was the Reds’ Wayne Simpson in 1970.

With 130 strikeouts and 12 wins this season, Tanaka is the first pitcher in franchise history to reach both of those marks before the All-Star break. The only Yankee to have more than 130 strikeouts prior to the break was David Cone in 1997 (160).

Zelous Wheeler, playing his first major-league game, went 2-for-4 with a homer and two runs scored. He is only Yankee over the last 100 years to have at least two hits, two runs scored and a homer in his MLB debut.

Robinson Who?
The Yankees entered Friday’s game averaging just 2.6 extra-base hits per game, the worst rate among AL teams. So of course they exploded for eight extra-base hits in the 6-5 win.

This is the first time the Yankees have had at least six doubles and two triples in a game since June 14, 1940 vs St. Louis Browns.

Brian Roberts led the offensive outburst with three doubles and a triple. He is the first Yankee second baseman with four extra-base hits in a game since Snuffy Stirnweiss in 1945.

The only other Yankee in the last 100 years with three-or-more doubles and at least one triple in a game was Red Rolfe in 1936.

Chase Whitley struggled again, giving up four runs on eight hits over three innings. He is now the only Yankee pitcher in last 100 years to have three straight starts of no more than four innings with at least eight hits and four runs allowed in each game.

David Huff threw three perfect innings out of the bullpen to get the win. The last Yankee to earn a win by pitching at least three innings in relief without allowing a baserunner was Rich Monteleone on June 5, 1993.

Cerv’d a loss
All good things must come to an end, right? The Yankees seven-game win streak at Target Field was snapped on Saturday in a 2-1, 11-inning loss. It was tied for the second-longest road win streak by the Yankees vs the Twins since the team moved to Minnesota in 1961.

This was the first time the Yankees suffered a walk-off loss against the Twins in extra innings since August 28, 1992.

The loss came on a throwing error by Francisco Cervelli, the second time this season the Yankees lost a game on an error, doing so also against the Blue Jays on June 24.

The last time the Yankees had two walk-off losses via error in a single season was in 1978, to the Blue Jays and Mariners.

Crazy Eights
The Yankees won 9-7 on Sunday, scoring their most runs in nearly two months. It was their first game with eight-or-more runs since May 7, snapping a streak of 53 straight games of seven or fewer runs, which was the team’s longest such streak in the designated hitter era (since 1973).

Derek Jeter and Ichiro Suzuki both had three hits, becoming just the third set of 40-year-old teammates in the last 100 years to each have at least three hits in a game.

It also happened on May 10, 1928 when the Philadelphia A’s Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker each had three hits against the St. Louis Browns, and on September 22, 2006 when the Giants’ Barry Bonds and Moises Alou did it against the Brewers.

Jeter’s three hits gave him 3,400 for his career. He is the third player in major-league history with at least 3,400 hits, 250 homers and 1,900 runs in a career, joining Hank Aaron and Stan Musial.

Former ESPN researcher; forever baseball and Yankees fan. Now living in northern Vermont and the color of the front door of our house is Yankee blue. Also write about college football and basketball and the NFL. Bleed Huskies blue (that's UConn, of course).