The Girardi name game

If you have not read this article by Daniel Barbarisi this morning, it is well worth a look. The article is all about how Joe Girardi gives all his players nicknames. You will want to read it just to figure out why Dean Anna is called, “Raccoon.” The article received a lot of traction in our staff e-mails this morning and I decided to play this Girardi name game for our staff generals and soldiers. Here is what I came up with.

Some of them are not real original, but then again, some of Girardi’s are either. “Jeets,” is rather bland is it not? Therefore Stacey Gotsulias simply becomes, “Gots.” Without further ado, here are the rest of our staff in Girardi form:

  • Jason Rosenberg = “Skip.”  I’d call him, “Rosie,” but I like writing here.
  • Larry Koestler = “Coast.”
  • Moshe Mandel = “Mosh.”
  • Brien Jackson = “Jackie.”
  • We’ll just call Michael Eder, “E.”
  • Tamar Chalker = “Tam.”
  • E.J. Fagan already has one in, “EJ.”
  • Brad Vietrogoski = “Veet.”
  • Domenic Lanza = “Major,” as in Major Domo.

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A voice crying in the infield wilderness

Shoot me if I disagree with just about everyone in the universe, but I like this infield. All due respect to my colleagues who I respect highly and most of our regular comment folks and most experts everywhere, I think the Yankees’ infield will be okay. I don’t want Didi Gregorius or Stephen Drew or Darwin Barney. I am fine taking this infield into the season. Wow…it’s lonely out here.

I have watched a lot of the spring games and I like what I see. I am a little worried about Derek

AP Photo/Chris O'Meara

AP Photo/Chris O’Meara

Jeter at the plate. Brian Roberts is moving around real well and looks like the Brian Roberts of five years ago. Mark Teixeira looks healthy and focused. And Kelly Johnson will be better than advertised. After all, he played for the Rays last year. Mick Kelleher likes what he sees.

The Yankees are in a very competitive division. As last year showed, a poor showing hit the attendance and television ratings hard, so there is a lot at stake this year.…

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Teixeira, Roberts, Beltran key to World Series title

You expect biting analysis from this site. Obviously, that differs greatly from analysis that bites. For anyone who studies the game, the hope is for an “aha” moment. I had one this morning and I could not wait to share it with you. This is one of those dope statistics that is going to land me on all the lists of writer geeks of all time. Here it is: Data suggests Mark Teixeira, Brian Roberts and Carlos Beltran all have to play significant time for the Yankees to win the World Series.

Whoo…that sounds good, doesn’t it? So what is the data that is going to shake the world? Every Yankee World Series champ in the Jeter-era featured at least three significant contributions from switch-hitters. Therefore, Teixeira, Roberts and Beltran all have to make significant contributions this season for the Yankees to win the World Series.

You are stunned, right? Brilliant, eh? If I do this right, now I have to throw a bunch of data at you to prove that I am a full-fledged Saberboy.…

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Faces of the Yankees

Several of my colleagues here have shared thoughts on Derek Jeter‘s retirement announcement. Coming on the heels of Mariano Rivera‘s and Andy Pettitte‘s last year and Jorge Posada‘s the year before, the Core Four will be no more. I guess I have sadness at the end of...

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Scrapbooking and scorecards

Long before there was the Internet or ESPN or even cable television, there were three ways for me to keep up with the sport of baseball and my team, the New York Yankees. There were broadcasts of games on WPIX: Channel 11 (or on radio), newspapers like the New York Daily News and the Bergen Record and The Sporting News (TSN). The Sporting News of my youth was an over-sized magazine printed on newspaper paper. Its arrival on Friday or Saturday was always one of the highlights of the week.

At that time, TSN really covered sports in depth and baseball in particular. Each team was given at least a full page or possibly two from journalists who covered those teams. The writing was fantastic and probably sowed some of the seeds of my own desire to write.

After I devoured that thing from cover to cover over a four or five hour period, my fingertips would be black from the ink.…

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Why The Yankees Should Eye Players That Carry Draft Pick Compensation

Despite signing Brian McCann and Jacoby Ellsbury to long term deals, the Yankees are trying their very best to acquire young talent for the future. With relatively new spending restrictions on prospects for winning teams, the Yankees have tried to crack the limitations of the new CBA. This season they acquired three first round picks, landing Eric Jagielo, Ian Clarkin, and Aaron Judge, as well as a big bonus second rounder in Gosuke Katoh. The organization also signed another top prospect in Leonardo Molina, a center fielder that was ranked by Baseball America as the 5th best international prospect for 2013.

While 2013 proved successful in acquiring top young talent, the Yankees did so by allowing Nick Swisher and Rafael Soriano to depart. The organization again lost Robinson Cano and Curtis Granderson in 2013, but the team has already given up their three first round picks by signing McCann, Ellsbury, and Carlos Beltran. To limit the impact of losing out on prime picks in the 2014 Rule 4 draft, the organization plans to break the international bonus pool restrictions for the 2014 class.…

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Getting Over Igawa

When the Rakuten Golden Eagles announced that Masahiro Tanaka would be posted, Yankees fans everywhere (and fans of most every team, I suspect) rejoiced. This off-season has been tainted by the specter of the $189 MM payroll, and yet Tanaka offers hope that the Yankees may well renege upon their new found frugality (insofar as guaranteeing some $300 MM to Jacoby Ellsbury, Brian McCann, and Carlos Beltran can be considered ‘frugal’). Throughout the off-season, there have been rumblings that the Yankees would be willing to break the bank for Tanaka, and Joel Sherman recently revealed that the front office would be willing go “way over” the $189 MM target, rather than brush up against it. Taken hand in hand, that sounds like a recipe for a Tanaka signing.

For all of this, it does seem like the Yankees have gotten over the disaster that was Kei Igawa. After all, Tanaka has been a part of the blueprint for the team’s off-season from the get-go.…

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Revitalizing The Yankee Brand With A Budget

…we’ll market it as New Slurm. Then, when everyone hates it, we’ll bring back Slurm Classic and make billions!

The above quote from Futurama refers to a real-life Coca-Cola conspiracy theory. In 1985, Coca-Cola released New Coke, completely changing the formula and leaving Coke drinkers incredibly disappointed. The conspiracy theory says that the Coca-Cola marketing department did this to counter declining sales, and the awful-tasting New Coke replaced regular Classic Coke to stir up free publicity. Of course after everyone protested the new formula, Coca-Cola went back to Coke Classic, and their brand was rejuvenated as soda drinkers returned to stores to grab up the original drink. Whether this was done by accident or with purpose will continue to be debated, but marketing vice president of Coca-Cola USA, Sergio Zyman, concluded that, “Yes, it infuriated the public, cost a ton of money and lasted only 77 days before we reintroduced Coca-Cola Classic. Still, New Coke was a success because it revitalized the brand and reattached the public to Coke.”

So what does this have to do with the Yankees?…

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Measuring Joe Torre as a manager

In my long life of watching the New York Yankees, I feel like I have two Yankee uncles. There was Phil Rizzuto and there is Joe Torre. Since the better half of me is Sicilian, I guess the feeling is natural. My Uncle Joe was elected into the Hall of Fame this week. I want to celebrate. I really want to celebrate. My problem is that I have no idea how to rate managers. In other words, I don’t know if he belongs there any more than Mayo Smith. You cannot go to a stat site and see WAR or wOBA totals for managers. And if you think win-loss records for pitchers are fairly useless, what does that make the win-loss total of a manager? So how, then, do we measure Joe Torre?

The current way managers make the Hall of Fame is to hang around a long time and win at least one World Series or manage the Yankees.…

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