Quick Hit: David Ortiz Sees Your Lightheadedness And Raises You…

… “Wet playing surface.”  That’s a new one.  Blows Teix right out of the water.  Because someone who’s not exactly in possession of cat-like quickness at first base, hardly ever runs hard on any ball hit to anywhere, and has one of the slowest, if not the slowest, home run trots in all of baseball is a prime candidate to be affected by wet ground conditions.  You could be playing baseball on an ice rink and chances are good that Big Sloppi wouldn’t stumble once.  That’s the benefit of moving that slowly.

Far be it for me to question the strategy, but that probably doesn’t help your cause in getting those last 2 team option years picked up in 2016 and 2017, big guy.  And we all know how much you love your money.  That’s why we at IIATMS came up with a helpful solution to make sure wet playing surfaces aren’t an issues again.  …

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Quick Hit: “Owning” a Hitter

Yesterday, I ventured into the depths of Baseball-Reference to see which pitchers the Yankees hitters have “owned” over the course of their careers. Today, I will use the same parameters (minimum of 10 PA) to see which hitters the Yankees pitchers have most thoroughly dominated. Unfortunately, Messrs Tanaka and Betances have not faced a single batter ten times in their careers.

Chris Capuano – .000/.000/.000, 1 K in 10 PA v. Shawn Green
Shawn Kelley – .182/.182/.182, 4 K in 11 PA v. Adam Jones
Hiroki Kuroda – .000/.077/.000, 2 K in 13 PA v. Gerardo Parra
Brandon McCarthy – .000/.067/.000, 5 K in 15 PA v. Jedd Gyorko
Ivan Nova – .000/.100/.000, 4 K in 10 PA v. Adrian Gonzalez
David Phelps – .000/.111/.000, 1 K in 10 PA v. Desmond Jennings
Michael Pineda – .091/.167/.091, 4 K in 12 PA v. Jose Bautista
David Robertson – .000/.000/.000, 3 K in 11 PA v. Colby Rasmus
CC Sabathia – .000/.000/.000, 6 K in 11 PA v.…

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Quick Hit: “Owning” a Pitcher

When Tony Gwynn passed away, one of my favorite statistics of his wonderful career was brought up by dozens of writers – his .415/.476/.521 slash line against Greg Maddux, complete with 0 strikeouts in 107 plate appearances. These match-up specific numbers are oftentimes disregarded, and with good reason, as the sample sizes are generally quite small and spread out across several seasons. However, that does not prevent them from being a blast to discuss.

Last night, Brett Gardner took Yu Darvish deep twice, raising his career line against the Rangers’ ace to .455/.500/1.545 with 4 home runs in only 12 PA. Only two other players have taken Darvish deep four times, and both play in the same division (Mike Trout and Brandon Moss). And, perhaps most interestingly, Gardner does not have more than two home runs against any other pitcher.

All of this made me wonder – what pitchers do other Yankees hitters “own?” So I set a baseline of 10 PA, and ventured into a Baseball-Reference wormhole to find out (using OPS as the measuring stick).…

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The IIATMS/TYA ‘At the Break’ Awards

The season is at its (artificial) midpoint, and you know what that means – it’s time to hand out some imaginary hardware! Eleven of our writers, myself included, cast their ballot yesterday, choosing the AL and NL MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year, as well as the Yankees Offensive Player (meaning the best position player, and not the most abominable) and Pitcher of the Year. This is a change of pace from last season, where we did not distinguish between position players and pitcher, and included an “award” for the least valuable Yankees.

Without further ado:

AL MVP: Mike Trout – .310/.400/.606, 22 HR, 10 SB, 181 wRC+, 5.5 fWAR, 5.5 bWAR

Trout is currently leading the league in on-base percentage, wRC+, OPS+, fWAR, bWAR, total bases, runs created, and extra base hits. He is also in the top-five in home runs, runs, RBI, doubles, triples, and walks. And, by most measures, he is on-pace to post the best overall offensive numbers of his young career – which may be the most telling, considering the sheer ridiculousness of his career to-date.…

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The Girardi name game

If you have not read this article by Daniel Barbarisi this morning, it is well worth a look. The article is all about how Joe Girardi gives all his players nicknames. You will want to read it just to figure out why Dean Anna is called, “Raccoon.” The article received a lot of traction in our staff e-mails this morning and I decided to play this Girardi name game for our staff generals and soldiers. Here is what I came up with.

Some of them are not real original, but then again, some of Girardi’s are either. “Jeets,” is rather bland is it not? Therefore Stacey Gotsulias simply becomes, “Gots.” Without further ado, here are the rest of our staff in Girardi form:

  • Jason Rosenberg = “Skip.”  I’d call him, “Rosie,” but I like writing here.
  • Larry Koestler = “Coast.”
  • Moshe Mandel = “Mosh.”
  • Brien Jackson = “Jackie.”
  • We’ll just call Michael Eder, “E.”
  • Tamar Chalker = “Tam.”
  • E.J. Fagan already has one in, “EJ.”
  • Brad Vietrogoski = “Veet.”
  • Domenic Lanza = “Major,” as in Major Domo.

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The best Yankees by uniform number

I really enjoyed an article on ESPN’s SweetSpot Network by Diane Firstman on uniform numbers. I have written about uniform numbers quite a bit over the years and have enjoyed those written by others–especially those numbers that are retired around the league. Firstman’s article made me think about Yankee uniform numbers and the...

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Scrapbooking and scorecards

Long before there was the Internet or ESPN or even cable television, there were three ways for me to keep up with the sport of baseball and my team, the New York Yankees. There were broadcasts of games on WPIX: Channel 11 (or on radio), newspapers like the New York Daily News and the Bergen Record and The Sporting News (TSN). The Sporting News of my youth was an over-sized magazine printed on newspaper paper. Its arrival on Friday or Saturday was always one of the highlights of the week.

At that time, TSN really covered sports in depth and baseball in particular. Each team was given at least a full page or possibly two from journalists who covered those teams. The writing was fantastic and probably sowed some of the seeds of my own desire to write.

After I devoured that thing from cover to cover over a four or five hour period, my fingertips would be black from the ink.…

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New voting criteria proposed for HOF Veterans Committee

Craig over at HBT has a posting up, calling attention to the maddening in-room debate from the HOF Veterans Committee voting. It’s absolutely worth a read. You don’t need to be as out on the other limb as Stacey’s newest crush, Brian Kenny, is, but there’s room to stray a bit from Murray Chass-dom.

First, from the original article from Bruce Jenkins:

At one point, someone asked if it was necessary to bring WAR, a trendy new stat, into any discussion. There was a bit of mumbling, mostly silence, and it never came up again . . . Whatever. I certainly didn’t feel dated or out of touch hashing out a man’s Hall of Fame credentials with Robinson, Fisk, Herzog or anyone else involved. I’m sure the brilliant Hirdt could have backed his opinions with WAR, WHIP or any other statistical measure known to man, but he spoke of traditional numbers and criteria of considerable weight: character, temperament, clutch performance and other intangibles, such as how it felt to witness the greats, and how they were viewed by other icons of the game.

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The Most Important News Of The Offseason So Far

I know sometimes I write things here that may come across as a bit ridiculous, and I’m the first to admit that there are instances where I intentionally add a dash or 2 of hyperbole to my posts to spark a reaction and discussion in the comment section.  But believe me when I tell you that I’m being 100% honest when I say this.  The idea of Brian Cashman and Jay-Z working together directly, 1-on-1, to negotiate Cano’s new deal is the most fantastically entertaining possibility in the history of MLB hot stove season and if you don’t agree then you have no sense of humor.

Just picture it.  Cash sitting there in his khakis and team polo shirt, Jay in a $10,000 suit and a pair of designer sunglasses with Memphis Bleek and Beanie Siegel flanking him, one of those giant bottles of Spades champagne on ice and a few Cuban cigars on standby to celebrate the new deal when it’s reached.  …

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