A-Rod, others, accused of illegal doping

After the Daily News reported over the weekend that a Miami anti-aging clinic was under federal investigation for supplying HGH and other banned substances to professional athletes, the Miami New Times has an explosive story out this morning that connects at least half a dozen MLB players, including Alex Rodriguez, to banned substances through Anthony Bosch and his clinic, Biogenesis. The Times reports that the personal records kept by Bosch detail illegal doping by A-Rod, Melky Cabrera, Yasmani Grandal, Barolo Colon (the last three, of course, having all failed drug tests in the past year), Nelson Cruz, and Gio Gonzalez (though it's a little unclear that Gonzalez is actually being accused of doping).

Here's what the paper claims about A-Rod's doping, which they claim includes HGH use as recently as 2012:

Take, for instance, one patient list from Bosch's 2009 personal notebook. It charts more than 50 clients and notes whether they received their drugs by delivery or in the office, how much they paid, and what they were taking.

There, at number seven on the list, is Alex Rodriguez. He paid $3,500, Bosch notes. Below that, he writes, "1.5/1.5 HGH (sports perf.) creams test., glut., MIC, supplement, sports perf. Diet." HGH, of course, is banned in baseball, as are testosterone creams.

That's not the only damning evidence against A-Rod, though. Another document from the files, a loose sheet with a header from the 19th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging and Aesthetic Medicine, lays out a full regimen under the name Cacique: "Test. cream... troches prior to workout... and GHRP... IGF-1... pink cream."

IGF-1 is a banned substance in baseball that stimulates insulin production and muscle growth. Elsewhere in his notebook, Bosch spells out that his "troches," a type of drug lozenge, include 15 percent testosterone; pink cream, he writes, is a complex formula that also includes testosterone. GHRP is a substance that releases growth hormones.

Yuri Sucart, A-Rod's cousin who was implicated in running PEDs for Alex, also appears in the records, as do transactions involving HGH, IGF-1, and other banned substances.

It's hard to say what this will mean for A-Rod at this early juncture (he's already going to miss most of the season and I don't think MLB can suspend anyone without a failed drug test), but you can definitely bet that this will be huge tabloid fodder and hang over Alex all season, if not longer. If proven true, I'd also wager that it likely means A-Rod has better than even odds at never making the Hall of Fame, what with going back on that contrite apology in 2009 and lying about when and how he was juicing.

Or he could seek rock solid treatment center in Costa Mesa, CA.